N & E
Napoleon & Empire

Battle of Borodino

Date and place

  • September 7, 1812 (August 26 in Russia's Julian calendar) near the village of Borodino and the town of Mojaïsk, 125 kilometers west of Moscow (Russia).

Involved forces

  • Grande Armée (125,000 to 130,000 men) under the command of Emperor Napoleon 1st.  
  • Russian Army (110,000 to 130,000 men) under Tsar Alexander I and General-in-Chief Mikhail Illarionovich Golenishchev-Kutuzov.  

Casualties and losses

  • Grand Army: probably around 30,000 men out of action (although figures vary widely depending on the source), including 49 generals and over 100 colonels.  
  • Russian Army: over 40,000 men killed or wounded.  

The Battle of Borodino was the biggest engagement of the Russian campaign, and one of the largest and deadliest of the Napoleonic period. Some 250,000 men fought, of whom 70,000 were put out of action. The French emerged victorious, but their success was not decisive.

The general situation

Napoleon I and his 600,000-strong Grande Armée entered Russia on June 25, 1812, to force Tsar Alexander I of Russia (Александр I Павлович Романов) to respect the terms of the Treaty of Tilsitt, signed in July 1807. Since then, the Russian government had gradually abandoned its commitments to the continental blockade, its consequences having been disastrous for the country's economy.

Negotiations between the two partners in 1809 and 1810 failed to resolve this and other issues, such as the fate of Poland. Relations gradually deteriorated. Finally, in 1811, Napoleon decided to impose a military settlement. The Russians, for their part, had been preparing for this since the previous year.

At the beginning of September 1812, the French had been pursuing an enemy for more than two months who had constantly evaded the decisive battle the French Emperor had been hoping and praying for, either deliberately or out of timidity. Having entered Russia hoping to secure a major commitment as quickly as possible, Napoleon let himself be drawn in much further than expected. It was now all the more important for him to achieve a convincing success.

Many of the Russian military, with their rather offensive temperament, resented to constantly retreat in front of the French. This led to a serious crisis in the army's general staff, and cost his post to the head of operations, Mikhail Bogdanovich Barclay de Tolly (Михаи́л Богда́нович Баркла́й-де-То́лли) − too wait-and-see and too un-Russian in the eyes of many. To replace him, on August 18 the Tsar reluctantly called in General Mikhail Illarionovich Golenishchev-Kutuzov (Михаил Илларионович Голенищев-Кутузов), whom he disliked.

Assuming supreme command, Golenishchev-Kutuzov in turn retreated to within 150 kilometers of Moscow − while regularly expressing his desire to face the enemy and fight. After that, he had no choice but to attempt to save the country's religious capital.

On September 3, the Russian army arrived near the village of Borodino [Бородино] [55.52750, 35.81975]. It first set up on the right bank of the Kalatsha River [река Колочъ], almost parallel to it. Its left flank touched Shevardino [Шевардино] to the west-southwest, then the front bent slightly to the east from the confluence with the Semionovskyi [Семеновский ручее] stream, and the right end of the position was at Maslovo [Маслово], to the east-northeast. This layout has since become known as the "first Russian position".

Shortly afterwards, the shortcomings of this layout led the Russian command to decide to move its left wing. During the day of September 5, it was to pivot around Borodino, bringing the Shevardino end south to Utitsa [Утицы]. This became known as the "second Russian position". It now put the Shevardino redoubt [Шевардинского редута] beyond the reach of Russian artillery, rendering it virtually useless.

September 5, 1812. The battle of Shevardino

In the early afternoon of September 5, 1812, the Russian rearguard, commanded by General Pyotr Petrovich Konovnitsyn (Пётр Петрович КоновницынPyotr Petrovich Konovnitsyn, burst onto the field, pursued by the French vanguard. At two o'clock, Prince Eugène de Beauharnais and his staff arrived in turn, shortly before the Emperor himself, who had come to examine the situation. A little later, on Eugène's orders, a first attempt was made to take Borodino. It went on long into the night, but to no avail.

While Eugène moved north, the rest of the Grande Armée settled on the site. General Louis-Pierre Montbrun Louis-Pierre Montbrun informed Joachim Murat that a major fortification had been observed between the villages of Doronino [Доронино] and Shevardino. Napoleon, immediately alerted, approached the site to study it. He discovered a pentagonal fortification: the Shevardino redoubt [55.49921, 35.79664].

In his report, Kutuzov described it as an unimportant place, intended merely to delay the enemy's advance, without its loss having any disastrous consequences. Yet thousands of men would die defending it. The unexpected arrival of the French surprised the Russian army just as it was moving its left wing towards Semenovskaya.

Unexpectedly, this move had to be made in contact with the enemy. There was a great risk that the latter would succeed in disrupting the operation and confusing the Russian army. As a result, this one had to stubbornly defend the redoubt until its left wing had taken up its new position.

Perhaps misled by faulty maps, Napoleon decided to seize the position before nightfall, believing that it covered the enemy left center and fearing that it would hinder the deployment of French troops. According to some (such as General Jean-Jacques Germain Pelet-Clozeau Jean-Jacques Germain Pelet-Clozeau), the Emperor, with a better knowledge of the terrain, would have settled for a flanking maneuver to force the Russians to withdraw.

However, once engaged, the battle quickly intensified.

Ahead of the rest of the I Corps, the 5rh Division of General Jean-Dominique Compans Jean-Dominique Compans was ordered to attack from the northwest, while Józef Antoni Poniatowski's Corps did the same from the wooded southwest. Followed by the cavalry units of Etienne-Marie-Antoine-Champion de Nansouty Etienne-Marie-Antoine-Champion de Nansouty and Louis-Pierre Montbrun, Compans crossed the Kalatsha at Fomkino [Фомкино] [55.50641, 35.76345] at around 3 p.m.

The number of men committed to the offensive was around 35,000, equipped with 194 cannons.

On the Russian side, 8,000 infantrymen, 4,000 cavalrymen and 36 cannons defended the position, under the command of Prince Andrey Ivanovich Gorchakov (Андрей Иванович ГорчавовAndrey Ivanovich Gorchakov.

Despite the importance of the battle, both Kutuzov and Napoleon were content to oversee it from a distance:

  1. The former never left his headquarters, northeast of Shevardino, except for a brief trip along the Russian lines. For the rest of the time, he relied on the information transmitted to him by his officers.
  2. The latter spent most of the day in his tent near Valuyevo [Валуево], occasionally observing the progress of operations through his telescope. Napoleon was suffering from a severe cold and a high temperature.

Poniatowski's Corps was the first to go into action. The Polish advance, briefly halted by a dragoon charge, quickly resumed, but suffered from machine-gun fire from Russian artillerymen at the Shevardino redoubt and skirmishers. Russian fighters managed to contain the attack. The Poles deployed 24 guns, but their disadvantageous position exposed them to Russian counterfire.

Meanwhile, to the northeast, the 5th division prepared. Compans hid his infantry in the folds of the ground while setting up his batteries (from 8 to 12 guns according to sources) on ridges. They immediately set to work bombarding the Russians. The numerically superior French artillery was now deployed on both sides of the redoubt. The Russians and French pounded each other for two hours.

At the same time, Murat's cavalry crossed the Kalatsha to fill the gap between Compans and Poniatowski, while the divisions of Louis Friant Louis Friant and Charles Antoine Louis Alexis Morand Charles Antoine Louis Alexis Morand did the same north of Aleksinki [Алексинки]. The 3rd division, of Maurice Etienne Gérard Etienne Maurice Gérard and light cavalry of Alexandre Louis Robert Girardin d'Ermenonville Alexandre Louis Robert Girardin d'Ermenonville followed. With such support, Compans was able to devote his entire division to a frontal assault on the redoubt.

Around 5 p.m., the voltigeurs were the first to march, followed by the 57th and 61st line regiments, led by Compans. He moved to the right side of the entrenchment, while the 25th and 111th line regiments were sent north, the former to attack the village of Shevardino itself, the latter to threaten the Russians with a turning movement to their right.

The intensity of the combined Franco-Polish shelling and musketry eventually overwhelmed the redoubt's defenders. The artillery battery there began to withdraw on its own initiative, while the infantrymen supporting it began to turn back. This momentary respite allowed the French to approach the redoubt. The Russian command was slow to put an end to this hesitation.

When they did, the Russians turned back and engaged in a deadly fusillade with the attackers. The two troops, separated by only a few dozen meters, blasted each other for almost three quarters of an hour. Compans then took command of two reserve battalions and personally led another assault. A battalion of the 57th line managed to enter the redoubt. Hand-to-hand combat was bloody.

By 7 p.m., the French were in control of the redoubt.

As night fell, Compans rallied his battalions, anticipating a counter-attack. In fact, Pyotr Ivanovich Bagration (Пётр Иванович Багратионv), commander of the 2nd Army of the West, which formed the Russian left flank, had sent reinforcements to Gorchakov. When these fresh units reached the battlefield, the fierce face-off resumed.

In the course of these new confrontations, the redoubt changed hands at least three times, according to some French memorialists, Gaspard Gourgaud in particular. The conditions made it difficult, even for the combatants, to get a clear idea of the course of operations. The darkness of the night led to surprises and mistakes.

This confused engagement finally came to an end around ten-thirty when Kutuzov learned that new French reinforcements had arrived on the battlefield and that the Poles were turning the Russian position to the left. Kutuzov recalled his troops and abandoned the fortress to the French. Russian sources all confirm that it was now in the hands of their compatriots. French memoirs claim the opposite.

The redoubt was definitively occupied by the French, who also held the villages of Aleksinki, Fomkino, Doronino and Shevardino. The Russians, exhausted, retreated to the Semionovskyi stream, which thus became their left flank.

Bagration, in a fiery account, asserted that despite the constant arrival of reinforcements, the enemy had been defeated everywhere by the courage of the Russians. Kutuzov, for his part, wrote to his wife, Ekaterina Ilyinichna Golenishcheva-Kutuzova (Екатерина Ильинична Голенищева-Кутузова), that he had had a hellish battle on the left flank that day.

Not much remained of the redoubt, and there was nothing left alive in its ruins. The surrounding area was strewn with the corpses of men and horses. Further on, the villages of Doronino and Shevardino were also devastated. Soldiers fell asleep in the bushes, despite the wind, the freezing rain and the presence of the enemy within pistol range.

Dominique-Jean Larrey's ambulances spent the night collecting the wounded (primarily allies, but some Russians too) and bringing them back to the infirmaries, where the surgeon's subordinates worked tirelessly. In the morning, the fruit of their labor was piled up in the ditches beside the road in the form of amputated limbs and lifeless bodies.

The battle of Shevardino proved costly for both sides. Russian losses are estimated at around 5,000 men and several cannons. French losses were somewhat lower, ranging from 4 to 5,000 soldiers. Some regiments suffered particularly badly, such as the 61st Line, one of whose battalions was wiped out. What surprised and worried the Emperor was the paltry number of enemy prisoners. To General Armand de Caulaincourt, who informed him of this, he asked a significant question: Are these Russians determined to win or die?

September 6th

The terrain

Once definitively fixed, on the morning of September 6, the Russian position stretched eight kilometers from north to south.

  1. Its right flank touched the Moskva [Москва-река] (the river, a sub-tributary of the Volga, from which Moscow takes its name) and rested on one of its tributaries, the Kalatsha. The latter was almost impassable from Borodino to Moskva; elsewhere, its right bank, often higher than the other, offered the Russians, who occupy it, definite protection.
  2. The center surrounds the Kurgannaia hill, in front of which flows the Semionovskyi stream.
  3. The left wing extended up to a thick forest, almost impenetrable in its natural state, but made even more impenetrable by Russian arrangements.

This position was an unprecedented seven kilometers deep. The bushes lining the rear of the fortifications provided valuable stealth for troop deployments and reserve Corps movements.

Major fortification work had reinforced the position's natural defensive assets. On the right wing, not far from the village of Gorki [Горки], two projecting batteries had been installed, housing three and nine artillery pieces respectively. In the center of the position, on a rise above the Kurgannaia heights, a bastion with front and side ramparts was built. Eighteen cannon had been placed here, and the whole thing had been dubbed "redoute Raïevski" by the French [батареи Раевского for the Russians] [55.51919, 35.82687].

The village of Borodino, on the west bank of the Kalatsha, was also fortified. On the Russian left wing, between the Kurgannaia and the forest, a little to the south of the village of Semenovskaya, three redents (works consisting of two faces which form a salient angle towards the countryside), known as "Bagration flèches" [Багратионовы флеши], were built [55.50526, 35.82792 for the one to the north, 55.504386, 35.82992 for the one to the center and 55.50242, 35.82743 for the one to the south].

The village itself was completely razed to the ground to give the artillery free rein. This side, however, represented the weak point of the system, as both Russian and French commanders were well aware.

All in all, the position, which blocked the two roads from Smolensk to Moscow, the old one [Старая смоленская дорога] as the new one [Новая смоленская дорога], was the best Kutuzov could find in the area, even if military writers are not allways very happy with it.

Establishment of armies

The Russian army faced west. Behind swarms of foot hunters, it was arranged in three lines, providing considerable stability and facilitating the movement of troops and equipment.

  1. The left wing (to the south, between the Great Redoubt and Utitsa) was under the command of Prince Bagration. He supervised the Corps of Nikolay Nikolayevich Rayevsky (Николай Николаевич РаевскийNicolay Nikolayevich Rayevsky, Mikhail Mikhailovich Borozdin (Михаил Михайлович Бороздин) and Nikolay Alexeyevich Tuchkov (Никола́й Алексе́евич Тучко́вNikolay Alexeyevich Tuchkov, the latter of whom had rushed in during the night to complete the position between Bagration's arrows and the village of Utitsa.
  2. The right (to the north, between the Great Redoubt and Moskva), made up of the Corps of Dmitry Sergeyevich Dokhturov (Дмитрий Сергеевич ДохтуровDmitry Sergeyevich Dokhturov, Alexander Ivanovich Ostermann-Tolstoy (Александр Иванович Остерман-Толсто́йAlexander Ivanovich Ostermann-Tolstoy, Karl Fyodorovich Baggovut (Карл Фёдорович БагговутKarl Fyodorovich Baggovut and the cavalry Corps of Pyotr Petrovich Pahlen(Пётр Петро́вич Па́ленPyotr Petrovich Pahlen, obeyed Barclay de Tolly.
  3. Kutuzov stood on a hill a little behind the village of Gorki.
  4. Grand Duke Konstantin (Великий князь Константи́н Па́вловичGrand Duke Constantine Pavlovich commanded the reserve.
  5. The cavalry was divided between the units of Karl Karlovich Sievers (Карл Карлович СиверсKarl Karlovich Sievers, Pahlen, Fyodor Karlovich Korf (Фёдор Ка́рлович КорфFedor Karlovich Korf and the Cossacks of Matvei Ivanovich Platov (Матвей Иванович ПлатовMatvei Ivanovich Platov and Fedor Petrovich Uvarov (Фёдор Петрович УваровFedor Petrovich Uvarov.

The Russians' total strength reached around 135,000 men, with 640 cannon (334 for the first line, 104 for the second and 186 for the third).

The Grande Armée remained in Shevardino after taking it. From north to south, the Corps of Prince Eugène, Michel Ney, Louis-Nicolas Davout and Joseph Poniatowski formed the front. Slightly behind Davout, the cavalry was divided between Montbrun, Marie-Victor-Nicolas de Faÿ de Latour-Maubourg Marie-Victor-Nicolas de Faÿ de Latour-Maubourg and Nansouty. The Imperial Guard was in reserve, as were the Corps of Jean Andoche Junot and Murat. Napoleon had a total of 130,000 soldiers and 587 cannons at his disposal.

In view of Kutuzov's system, Napoleon decided that turning the Russian army from the flanks, as Davout had proposed, was not only impossible, but far too risky. What's more, the movement would have to take place at night, when the Russians themselves, under similar conditions, had gotten lost fleeing Smolensk.

So, contrary to usual, he opted for a frontal assault. His intention was to drive the enemy into the Moskva before destroying them. He therefore concentrated the bulk of his army on an axis pointing towards the Bagration spires and the great Rayevsky redoubt. He himself positioned a little to the south of the Shevardino redoubt.

On the 6th, Kutuzov toured the Russian camp accompanied by popes and relics. In the evening, the Mikhail Semionovich Vorontsov (Михаил Семёнович ВоронцовMikhail Semionovich Vorontsov division moved into the spires. Napoleon, for his part, inspected the terrain, then had his soldiers Napoléon, à la veille de la bataille de la Moskova, présente à son état-major le portrait du roi de Rome peint par Gérard, by H. Vernet look at the portrait of his son Le Roi de Rome, by F. Gérard that he had received that very day.

It was also on this day that he heared the news of Auguste Frédéric Louis Viesse de Marmont's defeat at Salamanca, brought all the way from Spain by Captain Charles Nicolas Fabvier Charles Nicolas Fabvier, aide-de-camp to the Duke of Ragusa (Marmont).

September 7th. The Battle of Borodino

At dawn on September 7th (August 26 according to the Julian calendar then used by the Russians), Napoleon's proclamation was read in the bivouacs: Soldiers, this is the battle you have so longed for! From now on, victory depends on you. [...] Let it be said of you: "He was at this great battle under the walls of Moscow.

Between 5 and 6 a.m., the battle began with operations on the French center and extreme left. On this side, Prince Eugene carried out an attack on the village of Borodino, designed to divert enemy attention from the heart of the battlefield. The Russian fighters were pushed back and crossed a bridge on the right bank of the Kalatsha, which they did not have time to destroy behind them.

The 106th line regiment, instead of simply occupying the village as ordered, crossed in pursuit, coming up against Dokturov's entire army Corps, and was soon annihilated. The division of Alexis Joseph Delzons Alexis Joseph Delzons failed to hold on to its conquest in the face of the Russian counter-attack.

However, Dokturov's troops eventually withdrew, this time destroying the bridge behind them. Eugène now had to wait for the capture of the arrows before attacking the Rayevsky redoubt from the north with the Morand and Gérard divisions, who had also crossed the Kalatsha one kilometer west of Borodino. The Jean-Baptiste Broussier division remained in reserve on the left bank.

In the center, an intense artillery duel was initiated by the French. But their guns proved to be too far from the enemy lines. They had to be moved closer, which took time, as around 100 guns had to be translocated.

The Compans and Joseph Marie Dessaix Joseph Marie Dessaix divisions of Davout's Corps were ordered to seize the southernmost spire. Compans attacked in column, while Dessaix, in reserve, ensured the security of his rear and right. Russian artillery targeted them, and both generals were wounded, though this did not halt the progress of their troops.

Davout set off to lead them, but his horse was killed just as the right arrow was taken. The marshal fell so heavily that his death was announced. Napoleon sent Ney as reinforcement, Murat to replace Davout and general Jean Rapp to replace Compans. They found the Prince of Eckmühl (Davout) alive and well, but Rapp was wounded.

After an hour's fighting, Napoleon sent Ney's infantry and Murat's cavalry to support Davout, allocating some 40 additional cannons, and by 7.30 a.m. the arrows were in the hands of the Grande Armée. A Russian counter-attack led by Bagration with reinforcements from Kutuzov soon dislodged them.

Ney recaptured them for the first time at ten o'clock, then again at eleven and finally definitively at eleven-thirty. Until then, after each success, he had had to give ground to Baggovut, whom Barclay had positioned, with considerable forces and 24 cannons, at the village of Semenovskaya, just north of the spires.

While Ney, Davout and Murat were leading a frontal assault, Junot's Corps made its way through the Utitsa forest to the rear of the forts. A battery of Russian horse cavalry spotted the movement just as Junot was about to attack and opened fire on the French, who were then driven back into the woods by Baggovut's infantry.

In the decisive assault, Napoleon launched almost 45,000 men and 400 cannons to conquer the arrows. The Russians had only 20,000 to counter, but held out bravely, until General Bagration's wound sapped their morale. General Konovnitsyn temporarily took his place, and the Russians moved their defensive line back behind the Semionovskyi stream, where they were protected by the fire of 300 of their cannons. Dokturov was sent to replace Konovnitsyn. The fighting continued for several hours at this point, without the Russians ever giving ground.

At the end of the French right flank, General Poniatowski moved in front of Utitsa [55.48694, 35.84366] at around 8 a.m., then pushed Tuchkov back to the height of Utitsa. For the next three hours, his efforts to dislodge him failed, until Junot's support finally enabled him to take it by storm. The Poles of the Grande Armée were now in a position to turn the Russians to their left.

Aware of this danger, Tuchkov organized a victorious counter-attack in which he was mortally wounded. Baggovut succeeded him and managed to hold his position until the Russian center itself retreated behind the Semionovskyi stream.

But the Grande Armée's main effort was now focused on the Rayevsky redoubt.

To the north, Eugène de Beauharnais, after taking the village of Borodino, turned south-southeast towards the great redoubt. However his troops, faced with Russian counter-attacks, became disorganized and began to retreat. He left General Delzons to protect the village of Borodino, and crossed the Kalatsha to attack the fortification from the north. His artillery soon began to drive the Russians back.

Meanwhile, the Morand (from the south) and Broussier (from the west) divisions also attacked the fortification. Eventually, the French took control. Kutuzov, determined to retake it, brought forward a brigade and two regiments of the Russian Guard, supported by three batteries. Their counter-attack was victorious, despite the intervention of the Gérard division in support of Morand. The Russian troops regained possession of the fortress.

The French artillery took the lead in the battle. It intensively bombarded both the great redoubt, from Eugène's positions, and the Semenovskaya heights from those of Ney and Davout. The effects on the enemy ranks were considerable. The commander of the Russian artillery, General Alexander Ivanovich Kutaisov (Алекса́ндр Ива́нович Кута́йсовAlexander Ivanovich Kutaisov, was killed, disrupting the conduct of operations. Some of the guns left in reserve remained unused.

Hand-to-hand fighting continued for several hours, with frightening intensity, but without any convincing results.

Kutuzov tried to send two cavalry Corps to surprise the allied rear by overrunning their left flank. The maneuver failed, but slowed French operations and gave Kutuzov time to reinforce his center and his own left.

At around 2 p.m., the French army once again attacked the redoubt. This time, the Broussier, Morand and Gérard divisions led the attack, supported by the light cavalry of Louis-Pierre-Aimé Chastel Louis-Pierre-Aimé Chastel to the south and the II reserve cavalry Corps to the north. General Auguste Jean Gabriel de Caulaincourt Auguste Jean Gabriel de Caulaincourt, who had just been given command after Montbrun's death in an earlier charge, put himself at the head of the Pierre Wathier division and succeeded in taking the redoubt. He was killed shortly afterwards.

His success led to the withdrawal of the Russian cavalry at a time when Kutuzov's left and center were showing signs of weakness. Murat, Davout and Ney decided to call in the Imperial Guard to deal the final blow to the Russian army. Napoleon refused, anxious to keep his reserve intact when he had advanced so far into enemy territory.

It was now around 4 pm. The Russians retreated several hundred meters, but maintained their cohesion. By 6 p.m., they had regrouped on a new position, a ridge line further east.

By nightfall, Napoleon brought the army back to its original bases, while guarding the battlefield. He was convinced that the fighting would resume the following day, as the day's results had not been decisive for either side. However, at midnight, Kutuzov, believing his army to be too depleted to continue fighting, ordered a retreat. The retreat began before dawn on the morning of the 8th, in the direction of Moscow.

Results

Losses were enormous on both sides. At least 30,000 Frenchmen were put out of action, including 6,500 killed, among them 49 generals. The Russians counted 44,000 dead or wounded. Foremost among the twenty-four generals killed in the battle were Bagration, who died on September 24, and General Tuchkov.

Many of the survivors perished in the following days, particularly in the Grande Armée, due to lack of care or supplies.

Consequences

The battle so desired by Napoleon since the beginning of the campaign was not decisive. The Russian army was not destroyed and needed only a short time to make up for its losses. On the other hand, victory had cost the French too much for their situation to improve significantly.

So, a week later, on September 14, 1812, when they entered Moscow, the Tsar did not see this as sufficient reason to ask for peace. The outcome of this bloody confrontation was therefore particularly disappointing for Napoleon. His strategy, based on the search for the decisive shock that would totally destroy the enemy's ability to resist, failed.

Map of the battle of Borodino

Napoleonic Battles - Map of the battle of Borodino

Picture - "Battle of Borodino". Panorama painted 1911-1912 by Franz Alekseyevich Roubaud.

Napoleonic Battles - Picture of the battle of Borodino -

Order of battle

Russian forces: Infantry General Mikhail Golenishchev-Kutuzov First Army West: Infantry General Mikhail Barclay de Tolly II Infantry Corps: Lieutenant-General Karl Gustav Baggovut 4th Division: Major-General Prince Eugene von Württemberg 1st Brigade: Major-General Ignatii Rossi (wounded) Tobolsk Infantry Regiment
Volhynia Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Dmitry Pyshnitsky Kremenchug Infantry Regiment
Minsk Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Yegor Pillar 34th jaegers Regiment
4th jaegers Regiment
4th Artillery Brigade: Colonel Aleksey Voyeikov (mortally wounded) 4th Artillery Company
7th Light Artillery Company
8th Light Artillery Company
17th Division: Lieutenant-General Zakhar Olsufiev III 1st Brigade: Major-General Peter Ivelich IV (wounded) Ryazan Infantry Regiment
Brest Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Major-General Yakov Vadkovsky (wounded) Belozersk Infantry Regiment
Willmandstrand Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Yakov Potemkin 30th jaegers Regiment
48th jaegers Regiment
17th Artillery Brigade: Colonel Ivan Ditterix II (wounded) 17th Artillery Company
32nd Light Artillery Company
33rd Light Artillery Company
III Infantry Corps: lieutenant-General Nikolay Tuchkov I (mortally wounded) 1st Grenadier Division: Major-General Pavel Stroganov 1st Brigade: Colonel Peter Zheltukhin II Leib-grenadier Regiment
Count Arakcheyev Grenadier Regiment
2nd Brigade: Major-General Alexander Tsvilenev Pavlovsk Infantry Regiment
Yekaterinoslav Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Major-General Boris Foch I St. Petersburg Infantry Regiment
Tauride Infantry Regiment
3rd Division: Lieutenant-General Peter Konovnitsyn (wounded) 1st Brigade: Major-General Alexander Tuchkov IV (killed) Muromsk Infantry Regiment
Revel Infantry Regiment
1st Battalion of united grenadiers
2nd Brigade: Colonel Demid Mesheryakov (wounded) Chernigov Infantry Regiment
Selenguinsk Infantry Regiment
2nd United Grenadier Battalion
3rd Brigade: Major-General Prince Ivan Shakhovsky 20th jaeger Regiment
21st jaeger Regiment
3rd Artillery Brigade Half-Company of 1st Artillery Company
6th Light Artillery Company
IV Infantry Corps: lieutenant-General Alexander Ostermann-Tolstoy (wounded) 11th Division: Major-General Nikolay Bakhmetyev I (wounded) 1st Brigade: Major-General Pavel Choglokov Kexholm Infantry Regiment
Pernau Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Major-General Vasily Laptev (wounded) Polotsk Infantry Regiment
Yeletsk Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Adam Bistrom II 1st jaegers Regiment
33rd jaegers Regiment
11th Artillery Brigade: lieutenant-Colonel Alexander Maleyev II 2nd Artillery Company
3rd Light Artillery Company
Half-Company of the 4th Light Artillery Company
23rd Division: Major-General Aleksey Bakhmetyev III (wounded) 1st Brigade: Major-General Prince Ivan Gurielov (Gurieli) Yekaterineburg Infantry Regiment
Rylsk Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Major-General Fedor Aleksopol (wounded) Koporsk Infantry Regiment
18th Jaegers Regiment
23rd Artillery Brigade 44th Light Artillery Company
2nd united grenadier Brigade: Colonel Sergei Ostrovsky 1st united grenadier Battalion
2nd united grenadier Battalion
V Infantry Corps: Lieutenant-General Nikolay Lavrov Guard Infantry Division: Lieutenant-General Nikolay Lavrov 1st Brigade: Major-General Baron Grigory Rosen I Preobrazhenskii Regiment of the Guard
Semeyonovskii Guard Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Matvey Khrapovitsky (wounded) Izmailovskii Guard Regiment
Litovskii Guard Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Karl Bistrom I Guard Jaeger Regiment
Finlyandskii Regiment of the Guard
Guard Artillery Brigade: Colonel Alexander Eyler Grand Duke Mikhail Pavlovskii's 1st Guard Artillery Company
Count Arakcheyev's 2nd Guard Artillery Company
Major General Kaspersky's 1st Light Company
Captain Gogel's 2nd Light Company
Guard Crew Artillery
1st grenadier Brigade: Colonel Prince Grigory Kantakuzen (killed) 1st Grenadier Battalion of the 1st Division
2nd grenadier Battalion of the 1st Division
1st grenadier Battalion of the 4th Division
2nd grenadier Battalion of the 4th Division
1st Cuirassiers Division: Major-General Nikolay Borozdin II 1st Brigade: Major-General Ivan Shevich Regiment of Knight Guard
Regiment of Horse Guard
2nd Brigade: Major-General Nikolay Borozdin II Tsar's Regiment of Leib-Cuirassiers
Tsarina Leib Cuirassiers Regiment
Astrakhan Cuirassiers Regiment
Guard Horse Artillery Brigade: Colonel Peter Kozen 1st Battery of Horse Artillery
2nd Battery of Horse Artillery
VI Infantry Corps: Infantry General Dmitry Dokhturov 7th Division: Lieutenant-General of Artillery Peter Kaptsevich 1st Brigade: Colonel Dmitry Lyapunov IV Moscow Infantry Regiment
Pskov Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Aleksey Aigustov Libau Infantry Regiment
Sofia Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Nikanor Kashirinov 11th jaegers Regiment
36th jaegers Regiment
7th Artillery Brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Danil Devel 7th position Battery
12th Light Artillery Company
13th Light Artillery Company
24th Division: Major-General Peter Likhachev I (captured) 1st Brigade: Major-General Ivan Tsybulsky (wounded) Ufa Infantry Regiment
Shirvan Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Peter Denisyev Butyrsk Infantry Regiment
Tomsk Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Nikolay Vuich 19th jaegers Regiment
40th jaegers Regiment
24th Artillery Brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Ivan Yefremov (wounded) 24th Artillery Company
45th Light Artillery Company
46th Light Artillery Company
I Reserve Cavalry Corps: Lieutenant-General Fedor Uvarov 1st Brigade: Major-General Anton Chalikov Guard Dragoon Regiment
Guard Uhlans Regiment
2nd Brigade: Major-General Vasily Orlov-Denisov Guard Hussars Regiment
Guard Cossack Regiment
Guard Black Sea Cossack Sotnia
3rd Brigade: Major-General Aleksey Vsevolozhsky I Yelisavetgrad Hussars Regiment
Nezhinsk Dragoon Regiment
2nd Horse Artillery Company of the 1st Reserve Artillery Brigade
II Reserve Cavalry Corps: Major-General Fedor (Friedrich Nicholas Georg) Korf 1st Brigade: Colonel Nikolay Davydov Moscow Dragoon Regiment
Pskov Dragoon Regiment
2nd Brigade: Major-General Semen Panchulidzev II Izumsk Hussars Regiment
Polish lancer Regiment
6th Horse Artillery Company of the 2nd Reserve Artillery Brigade
III Reserve Cavalry Corps: Major-General Fedor Korf 1st Brigade: Major-General Stepan Dyatkov Curonian Dragoon Regiment
Orenburg Dragoon Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Baron Cyprian Creitz (wounded) Irkutsk Dragoon Regiment
Siberian Dragoon Regiment
3rd Brigade: Major-General Ivan Dorokhov Marioupol Hussars Regiment
Sumsk Hussards Regiment
7th Horse Artillery Company of the 3rd Reserve Artillery Brigade
Irregular forces: Cavalry General Matvei Platov Independent units Don Cossack Ataman Regiment
1st Boug Cossack Regiment
1st Bashkir Cossack Regiment
1st Teptyarsk Cossack Regiment
1st Brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Maxim Vlasov III Adrianov II Don Cossack Regiment
Chernozubov Don Cossack Regiment VIII
Vlasov III Don Cossack Regiment
Perekop Tatar Cavalry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Major-General Nikolay Ilovaisky V Ilovaisky V Don Cossack Regiment
Grekov XVIII Don Cossack Regiment
3rd Brigade: Major-General Vasily Denisov VII Denisov Don Cossack Regiment VII
Zhirov Don Cossack Regiment
5th Brigade: Major-General Dmitry Kuteinikov II Kharitonov Don Cossack Regiment VII
Simferopol Tatar Cavalry Regiment
Artillery 2nd Don Cossack Artillery Company
Artillery Reserve 1st Artillery Brigade of the 1st grenadier Division 1st Light Artillery Company
2nd Light Artillery Company
3rd Infantry Division Artillery Brigade 5th Light Artillery Company
2nd Reserve Artillery Brigade 4th Horse Artillery Company
5th Horse Artillery Company
29th Artillery Company
30th Artillery Company
3rd Reserve Artillery Brigade 9th Horse Artillery Company
10th Horse Artillery Company
4th Pontooners Company
4th replacement Artillery Brigade
Second Army of the West: Infantry General Peter Bagration (mortally wounded) VII Infantry Corps: Lieutenant-General Nikolay Rayevsky 12th Division: Major-General Illarion Vasilchikov I (wounded) 1st Brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Andrey Bogdanovsky (wounded) Narva Infantry Regiment
Smolensk Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Karl Friedrich Pantzerbiter (wounded) Novoingermanland Infantry Regiment
Aleksopol Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Andrey Glebov (wounded) 6th jaegers Regiment
41st jaegers Regiment
26th Division: Major-General Ivan Paskevich 1st Brigade: lieutenant-Colonel Nikolay Kadyshev (killed) Nizhny Novgorod Infantry Regiment
Orel Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Yeremei (Geronimo) Savoini (wounded) Ladoga Infantry Regiment
Poltava Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Fedor Gogel I 5th jaegers Regiment
42nd jaegers Regiment
26th Artillery Brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Gustav Shulman II 26th Artillery Company
47th Light Artillery Company
VIII Infantry Corps: Lieutenant-General Mikhail Borozdin I 2nd Grenadier Division: Major-General Karl von Mecklenburg-Schwerin (wounded) 1st Brigade: Colonel Ivan Shatilov (wounded) Kiev grenadier Regiment
Moscow Grenadier Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Ivan Buxhöwden (killed) Astrakhan grenadier Regiment
Fanagoria grenadier Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Dmitry Levin Siberian Grenadier Regiment
Little Russia Grenadier Regiment
2nd Artillery Brigade: Colonel Alexander Boguslavsky 11th Artillery Company
21st Light Artillery Company Division
27th Division: Major-General Dmitry Neverovsky (wounded) 1st Brigade: Colonel Maxim Stavitsky II (wounded) Odessa Infantry Regiment
Tarnopol Infantry Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Alexander Knyazhnin I (wounded) Vilna Infantry Regiment
Simbirsk Infantry Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Alexey Voyeikov of the Preobrazhensk Guard Regiment 49th Jaegers Regiment
50th Jaegers Regiment
Artillery 32nd Artillery Company (from 3rd Reserve Artillery Brigade)
2nd united grenadier Division: Major-General Mikhail Vorontsov (wounded) 1st Brigade 1st united grenadier Battalion of the 7th Division
2nd united grenadier Battalion of the 7th Division
1st united grenadier Battalion of the 24th Division
2nd grenadier Battalion of the 24th Division
2nd Brigade 1st grenadier Battalion of the 2nd grenadier Division
2nd grenadier Battalion of the 2nd grenadier Division
1st grenadier Battalion of the 12th Division
2nd grenadier Battalion of the 12th Division
2nd grenadier Battalion of the 26th Division
1st Battalion of united grenadiers of the 27th Division
2nd Battalion 27th Division grenadiers réunis
Artillery 1st Don Horse Artillery Company
Artillery attached to the VIII Corps 1st Brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Karl Taube of the Life Guard Artillery Brigade 3rd Artillery Company
3rd Brigade Half-Company 1st Artillery Company
3rd Reserve Artillery Brigade 31st Artillery Company
2nd Western Army Cavalry: Lieutenant-General Dmitry Golitsyn V 2nd Cuirassiers Division: Major-General Ilya Duka II 1st Brigade, Major-General Nikolay Kretov (wounded) Yekaterinoslav Cuirassiers Regiment
Voyennogo Order Cuirassiers Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Mikhail Tolbuzin I (mortally wounded) Glukhov Cuirassiers Regiment
Little Russia Cuirassiers Regiment
Novgorod Cuirassiers Regiment
IV Reserve Cavalry Corps: Major-General Karl Sievers I (wounded) 1st Brigade: Major-General Ivan Panchulidzev I Kharkov Dragoon Regiment
Chernigov Dragoon Regiment
2nd Brigade: Colonel Yegor Emmanuel (wounded) Kiev Dragoon Regiment
Novorossiisk Dragoon Regiment
3rd Brigade: Colonel Dmitry Vasilchikov II Akhtyrsk Hussards Regiment
Lithuanian Uhlans Regiment
Irregular troops of the Second Army of the West: Major-General Akim Karpov II Cossack Forces Bykhalov I Don Cossack Regiment
Grekov's Don Cossack Regiment XXI
Ilovaisky Don Cossack Regiment X
Don Ilovaisky Cossack Regiment XI
Karpov Don Cossack Regiment II
Komissarov Don Cossack Regiment I
Melnikov Don Cossack Regiment IV
Sysoyev III Don Cossack Regiment
Second Western Army Reserve Artillery 12th Artillery Brigade (of the 12th Division): Lieutenant-Colonel Yakov Sablin (wounded) 12th Artillery Company
22nd Light Artillery Company
23rd Light Artillery Company
2nd Artillery Brigade (of the 2nd grenadier Division) 20th Light Artillery Company
21st Light Artillery Company
23rd Artillery Brigade (of the 23rd Division): Lieutenant-Colonel Lavr Gulevich 23rd Artillery Company
26th Artillery Brigade (of the 26th Division) 48th Light Artillery Company
3rd Reserve Artillery Brigade 4th Pontoon Company
Opolchenye Forces Moscow Opolchenye: Lieutenant-General Irakly Morkov 1st Division 1st Regiment of jaegers
4th Cossack Regiment on foot
6th Cossack Regiment, Dismounted
2nd Division 7th Cossack Regiment on foot
3rd Division: Major-General Fedor Talyzin I 2nd jaegers Regiment
3rd jaeger Regiment
1st Cossack Regiment on foot
3rd Cossack Regiment on foot
Militia Vereya and Volokolamsk district (uezd) troops
Smolensk Opolchenye: Lieutenant-General Nikolay Lebedev (wounded) Belsk District Opolchenye: Lieutenant-Colonel Pavel Rachinsky
Vyazma District Opolcheny: Lieutenant-Colonel Vyazemsky
Gzhatsk District Opolchenye: Second Lieutenant Gleb Mikulin
Dorogobouzh District Opolchenye: Colonel Yegor Sivai
Dukhovo District Opolchenye: Colonel Alexey Lebedev
Yelna district opolchenye: Major Dmitry Glinka
Krasnyi District Opolchenye: Lieutenant Gramotin
Roslavl district opolchenye: Staff Captain Bogdan Azanchevsky
Smolensk District Opolcheny: Lieutenant-Colonel Mikhail Vonlyarlyarsky
Sychev District Opolchenye: Captain of the 2nd rank Alexey Melnikov
Yukhnov District Opolchenye: Lieutenant-Colonel Peter Lagunov I
French forces: Napoleon I Imperial Guard Young Guard: Marshal Adolphe Edouard Mortier Delaborde Division Brigade: Brigadier General Pierre Berthezène 4th Voltigeurs Regiment: Colonel-Major Thomas-Patrice Nagle
4th Tirailleurs Regiment: Colonel-Major Simon Robert
5th Voltigeurs Regiment: Colonel-Major Joseph-Victorien Sicard
2nd Guard Division: Division General François Roguet 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Jean-Pierre Lanabère (killed) 1st Guard Tirailleurs Regiment: Colonel Lenuart
1st Guard Voltigeurs Regiment: Colonel Mallet
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Louis Léger Boyeldieu Guard Fusiliers Chasseurs Regiment: Colonel Vrenier
Guard Fusiliers Grenadiers Regiment: Colonel Bodlen
Artillery: Colonel Villeneuve 3rd foot Artillery Regiment of the Young Guard
2nd Company of the Guard Artillery Train Battalion
Vistula Legion: Division General Michel Marie Claparède 1st Vistula Regiment: Colonel Konsinovski
2nd Vistula Regiment: Colonel Malchevski
3rd Vistula Regiment: Colonel Fondzelski
13th Company of the 8th foot Artillery Regiment
Reserve Artillery: Division General Henri-Marie Nourry
3rd Old Guard foot Artillery Regiment
Detachment of the 1st Guard Artillery Train Battalion
5th and 7th foot batteries of the Prussian Artillery Brigade
Old Guard: Marshal Francois Joseph Lefebvre 3rd Guard Division: Division General Philibert Jean-Baptiste François Curial 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Joseph Boyer de Rebeval 1st Chasseurs à Pied Regiment: Brigadier General Jean-Louis Gros
2nd Chasseurs à Pied Regiment: Colonel Baron Rozet
Artillery: Battalion Commander Cotten 1st Vieille Guard foot Artillery Regiment
2nd foot Artillery Regiment of the Young Guard
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Claude Etienne Michel 1st foot grenadiers Regiment: Colonel Lored de Legras
2nd foot grenadiers Regiment: Colonel Baron Louis Harlet
3rd foot grenadiers Regiment: Brigadier General Ralph Dundas Tindal
Artillery: Major Boulart 2nd foot Artillery Regiment of the Old Guard
1st foot Artillery Regiment of the Young Guard
4th Company of the 2nd Guard Artillery Train Battalion
Detachment of the 1st Battalion of the Guard Artillery Train
Detachments of the 4th and 7th Artillery Train Battalions
Guard Cavalry: Marshal Jean Baptiste Bessières Guard Cavalry Division: Division General Frédéric Henri Walther 1st Brigade: Division General Charles Lefevbre-Desnouettes Guard Chasseurs à cheval Regiment: Division General Claude-Etienne Guyot
Mamelukes of the Guard: Squadron Ched Karmann
2nd Brigade: Division General Raymond Gaspard de Saint Sulpice Empress Guard Dragoon Regiment: Colonel Letort
3rd Brigade: Division General Frédéric Henri Walther Guard grenadiers à cheval Regiment: Brigadier General Louis Lepic
4th Brigade: Brigadier General Wincenty Krasiński 1st Regiment of Polish Lancers of the Guard: Colonel Pierre Dautancourt
5th Brigade: Brigadier General Pierre David de Colbert-Chabanais 2nd Regiment of Chevau-légers lancers of the Guard: Colonel Dubya de Ferrier
6th Brigade: Division General Antoine Jean Auguste Henri Durosnel Gendarmerie d'élite: Colonel Henri
Artillery: Squadron leader Jean Marin-Dubuard 1st Horse Artillery Regiment of the Old Guard
2nd Horse Artillery Regiment of the Old Guard
Detachment of the 2nd Battalion of the Guard Artillery Train
Detachment of the 7th Artillery Train Battalion
Guard Artillery Reserve: Division General Jean Barthelemy Sorbier Foot Artillery: Colonel Antoine Drouot 4th Company of the Old Guard
5th Company of the Old Guard
6th Company of the Old Guard
Detachment of the 1st Battalion of the Guard Artillery Train
Detachment of the 2nd Battalion of the Guard Artillery Train
Horse Artillery: Brigadier General Jean-Jacques Desvaux de Saint-Maurice 3rd Company of the Old Guard
4th Company of the Old Guard
Engineers: Brigadier General François-Joseph Kirgener Company of Sappers of the Old Guard
Marine Detachment of the Guard
6th Company of Guard seamen
7th Company of Guard Sailors
I Corps: Marshal Louis Nicolas Davout (wounded) 1st Division: Division General Charles Antoine Louis Alexis Morand 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Alexandre Dalton 13th Light Infantry Regiment: Colonel Pierre Jacques du Bousquet d'Argence
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Pierre Guillaume Gratien 17th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Baron Louis Vasserot
3rd Brigade: Brigadier General Charles Auguste Bonnamy (wounded, captured) 30th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Charles Joseph Buquet (wounded)
Artillery: Captain Beroville 1st Company of the 7th foot Artillery Regiment
7th Company of the 1st Horse Artillery Regiment
1st and 2nd companies of the 1st main Train Battalion
Auxiliaries: Battalion chief Girarden 6th Company of the 3rd Sapper Battalion
1st Company of the 12th Crew Battalion
2nd Division: Division General Louis Friant 1st Brigade: Brigadier General François Marie Dufour (wounded) 15th Light Infantry Regiment: Major Brice
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Antoine Baudouin Gisbert Van Dedem Van de Gelder 33rd Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Étienne François Raymond Pouchelon (wounded)
3rd Brigade: Colonel Groisne 48th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Joseph Groisne
2nd and 3rd Battalions of the Joseph Napoleon Regiment (Spanish): Colonel Jean-Baptiste-Marie-Joseph de Tschudy
Artillery: Battalion Commander Cabrié 2nd Company of the 7th foot Artillery Regiment
5th Company of the 3rd Horse Artillery Regiment
4th and 6th companies of the 9th Train Battalion
Auxiliaries 5th Company of the 5th Sapper Battalion
4th Company of the 12th Crew Battalion
3rd Division: Division General Maurice Etienne Gérard 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Louis Nicolas Marin Leclerc des Essarts 7th Light Infantry Regiment: Colonel Jean-François Rome (wounded)
2nd Brigade: Colonel Henri-Aloyse-Ignace Baudinot 12th Line Infantry Regiment: Major Nicolle
3rd Brigade: Division General Maurice Etienne Gérard 21st Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Francois Marie Cyprien Teullé (wounded)
127th Line Infantry Regiment (did not take part in the battle)
Artillery: Colonel Christophe Pelgrin 3rd Company of the 7th foot Artillery Regiment
4th Company of the 3rd Horse Artillery Regiment
7th and 4th companies of the 1st main Train Battalion
1st and 4th companies of the 1st Train Battalion
Auxiliaries 9th Company of the 5th Sapper Battalion
1st and 3rd Companies of the 12th Crew Battalion
4th Division: Division General Joseph Marie Dessaix (wounded) 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Jean Parfait Friederichs 85th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Jean-Pierre Piat
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General François Joseph Leguay 108th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Michel-Jacques-François Achard (wounded)
2nd Hesse-Darmstadt "Leib" Regiment (did not take part in the battle)
Artillery: Battalion Commander Thevenot 9th Company of the 7th foot Artillery Regiment
2nd Company of the 5th Horse Artillery Regiment
3rd and 6th companies of the 1st Train Battalion
Auxiliaries 3rd Company of the 2nd Sapper Battalion
4th Company of the 12th Crew Battalion
5th Division: Division General Jean-Dominique Compans (wounded) 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Jean Duppelin 25th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Dunesme
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General François Antoine Teste (wounded) 57th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Jean-Louis Charrière
3rd Brigade: Brigadier General Pierre Jules César Guyardet 61st Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Baron Charles Bouge
4th Brigade: Brigadier General Louis Longchamp 111th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Juillet
Artillery: Battalion Commander Klie 2nd Company of the 6th Horse Artillery Regiment
16th Company of the 7th foot Artillery Regiment
2nd and 4th companies of the 9th main Train Battalion
Auxiliaries 5th Company of the 3rd Sapper Battalion
3rd and 5th companies of the 12th Crew Battalion
Reserve Artillery 3rd Company of the 1st foot Artillery Regiment
17th Company of the 1st foot Artillery Regiment
6th Company of the 7th foot Artillery Regiment
Artillery park 1st, 5th and 6th companies of the 1st Train Battalion
Engineers: Battalion Chief Proust
8th Company of the 5th Sapper Battalion
5 companies of the 9th Train Battalion
5 companies of the 12th Crew Battalion
Light Cavalry: Brigadier General Alexandre Louis Robert Girardin d'Ermenonville - attached to the I Cavalry Corps 1st Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Alexandre Louis Robert Girardin d'Ermenonville 2nd chasseur Regiment: Colonel Mathis
9th Polish Uhlans Regiment: Colonel Pzyshikhovski
2nd Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Étienne Tardif de Pommeroux de Bordesoulle 1st Regiment of Chasseurs: Colonel Charles-André Méda (mortally wounded at Shevardino on September 5)
3rd chasseur Regiment: Squadron leader Dejean
III Corps: Marshal Michel Ney 10th Division: Division General François Roch Ledru des Essarts 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Louis Thomas Gengoult 24th Light Infantry Regiment: Colonel de Julienne de Bellair
1st Portuguese Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel François Antoine Freire-Pégo
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Charles Stanislas Marion (killed) 46th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Jean Louis Brue
3rd Brigade: Brigadier General Jean-Baptiste Bruny 72nd Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Lafitte
Artillery: Battalion Commander Ragmey 12th Company of the 5th foot Artillery Regiment
5th Company of the 6th Horse Artillery Regiment
Auxiliaries 1st and 2nd companies of the 6th main Train Battalion
7th Company of the 3rd Sapper Battalion
11th Division: Division General Jean Nicolas Razout 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Claude-Antoine Compère (killed) 2nd Portuguese Line Infantry Regiment: Major Xavier
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Joseph Antoine René Joubert 18th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Pierre de Pelleport
4th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Massy (killed)
3rd Brigade: Brigadier General François Nivard Charles Joseph d'Hénin 93rd Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Pierre-François Bauduin (wounded)
Artillery: Battalion Commander Bernard 18th Company of the 5th foot Artillery Regiment
6th Company of the 5th Horse Artillery Regiment
Auxiliaries 1st and 3rd companies of the 6th main Train Battalion
9th Company of the 3rd Sapper Battalion
25th (Württemberg) Division: Division General Jean Gabriel Marchand Temporary Württemberg Infantry Regiment: Major-General Ernst Eugen Freiherr von Hügel and Colonel Stockmayer
Artillery: Lieutenant-Colonel von Brandt 1st Württemberg foot Artillery Regiment
2nd Württemberg Dismounted Artillery Regiment
1st Württemberg Horse Artillery Regiment
Light Cavalry 9th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Pierre Mourier 11th Hussards Regiment (Dutch): Colonel de Collaert
6th Regiment of Chevau-légers lancers: Squadron leader Jacob
4th Regiment of the King's Württemberg Chasseurs: von Munchigen
14th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Frédéric Auguste Beurmann 4th mounted chasseur Regiment: Colonel Boulnois
28th Chasseurs à cheval Regiment: Major de Quinto d'Avogrado
1st Württemberg Regiment of Light Horse: Colonel von Falkenschtein
2nd Württemberg Light Horse Regiment: Colonel von Normann-Erenfels
2nd Württemberg Horse Artillery Regiment
Reserve Artillery: Colonel Marie Claude Bernard Verrier Artillery: 16th Company of the 1st foot Artillery Regiment
Württemberg Reserve Battery
Württemberg Regimental Artillery
Artillery park: 4th and 5th companies of the 6th Train Artillery Battalion
Engineers: Battalion Chief Campredon 3rd Company of the 1st Sapper Battalion
6th Engineer Company
8th Company of the 1st Pontooners Battalion
5th Company of Artillery craftsmen
IV Corps: Eugene de Beauharnais 13th Division: Division General Alexis Joseph Delzons 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Léonard Huard de Saint Aubin (killed) 8th Light Infantry Regiment: Colonel Serrant
84th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Jean-Gaudens-Claude Pégot
1st Croatian provisional Regiment: Colonel Marko Šljivarić
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Louis Auguste Marchand de Plauzonne (killed) 92nd Line Infantry Regiment: Major Jean Marie Tissot
106th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Bertrae (wounded)
Artillery: Battalion chief Demay 9th Company of the 2nd foot Artillery Regiment
2nd Company of the 4th Horse Artillery Regiment
2nd and 3rd companies of the 7th Train Battalion
Auxiliaries: 7th Company of the 1st Sapper Battalion
14th Division: Division General Jean-Baptiste Broussier 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Louis Bertrand de Sivray 18th Light Infantry Regiment: Colonel Louis-Marie Gaussart
53rd Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Pierre André Grobon
1st and 4th Battalions of the Joseph Napoleon Regiment (Spanish): Major Dorey
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Louis Alméras 9th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Vautré
35th Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Penant
Artillery: Battalion Chief Hermann 7th Company of the 2nd foot Artillery Regiment
3rd Company of the 4th Horse Artillery Regiment
1st and 6th companies of the 7th Train Battalion
Auxiliaries 2nd Company of the 1st Sapper Battalion
Italian Royal Guard: Brigadier General Joseph Lechi
Infantry Brigade: Brigadier General Joseph Lechi
Royal Velites: Colonel Moroni
Guard Infantry Regiment: Brigadier General Joseph Lechi
Guard conscript Regiments: Colonel Peraldi
Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Triaire Guard of Honor: Captain Widman
Guard Dragoon Regiment: Colonel Jacquet
Queen's Dragoon Regiment: Colonel Narboni
Artillery: Battalion Commander Clément 1st Italian foot Artillery Regiment
2nd Italian foot Artillery Regiment
1st Italian Horse Artillery Regiment
1st and 2nd companies of the Italian Guard Artillery Train
2nd Company of artisans of the Italian Guard
Auxiliaries 1st Company of the 1st Italian Sapper Battalion
Sailors of the Italian Guard
Cavalry Corps: Division General Philippe Antoine Ornano 12th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Claude Raymond Guyon 9th Chasseurs à cheval Regiment: Colonel de Bruneteau de Sainte-Suzanne
19th mounted Cavalry Regiment: Colonel Vincent
13th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Giovanni Villata 2nd Italian mounted chasseur Regiment: Colonel Banko
3rd Italian mounted Cavalry Regiment: Colonel Rambourgt
Bavarian Cavalry Division: Division General von Preysing-Moos 21st Light Cavalry Brigade: Division General von Seydewitz 3rd Kronprinz Bavarian Light Horse Regiment: Colonel Elbracht
6th Bavarian Bubenhofen Light Horse Regiment: Colonel von Dietz
22nd Light Cavalry Brigade: Division General von Preysing-Moos 4th Bavarian Light Horse Regiment: Colonel Seyssel
5th Bavarian Light Horse Regiment: Colonel Gaddum
Artillery Brigade 1st Bavarian Horse Artillery Regiment: Captain Wiedemann
Reserve Artillery 5th Company of the 2nd foot Artillery Regiment
12th Company of the 2nd foot Artillery Regiment
2nd Company of the 1st Italian foot Artillery Regiment
7th Company of the 1st Italian foot Artillery Regiment
Auxiliaries 5th Company and Detachment of the 7th Train Battalion
5th and 6th companies and Detachment of the 9th Italian Train Battalion
1st Company and Detachment of the 2nd and 6th companies of the 9th Crew Battalion
1st Company of the 2nd Pontooners Battalion
1st and 3rd companies of the 1st Italian Crew Battalion
V Corps: Division General Józef Antoni Poniatowski 16th Division: Division General Izydor Krasiński 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Izydor Krasiński 3rd Polish Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Blumer
15th Polish Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Strishevski
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Franciszek Paszkowski 16th Polish Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Prince Constantine Czartorisky
Artillery: Battalion Commander Sowinski 3rd Polish foot Artillery Regiment Company
12th Polish foot Artillery Regiment Company
3rd Company of the Polish Artillery Train Battalion
Auxiliaries 1st Company of the Polish Sapper Battalion
Polish Artillery craftsmen Company Detachment
18th Division: Division General Charles Kniaziewicz 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Łukasz Biegański 2nd Polish Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Shimanowski
8th Polish Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Kajetan Stuart
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Stanisław Potocki 12th Polish Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Mathias Wiezbinski
Artillery: Battalion Commander Ushinski 4th Polish Foot Artillery Regiment Company
5th Polish foot Artillery Regiment Company
2nd Company of the Polish Artillery Train Battalion
2nd Company of the Polish Artillery Train Battalion
Auxiliaries: One Company of the Polish Sapper Battalion
Cavalry: Division General Michał Ignacy Kamieński 18th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Józef Niemojewski 4th Polish Horse Regiment: Colonel Dulfus
19th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Tadeusz Tyszkiewicz 1st Polish mounted hunter Regiment: Colonel Constantine Przebendowski
12th Polish Uhlans Regiment: Colonel Joseph Rzyszczewski
20th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Antoni Paweł Sułkowski 5th Polish mounted Hunter Regiment: Colonel Sigismond Kurnatowski
13th Polish Hussars Regiment: Colonel Joseph Tulinski
Reserve Artillery: Colonel Antoine Gurski 2nd Polish Horse Artillery Company
14th Polish foot Artillery Company
Polish Regimental Artillery
Auxiliaries: 4th and 5th companies of the Polish Artillery Train Battalion
One Company of Polish Pontooners
Two companies of the Polish Sapper Battalion
Four companies of the Polish Crew Battalion
VIII Corps: Division General Jean Andoche Junot 23rd Infantry Division: Division General Jean-Victor Tharreau (mortally wounded) 1st Brigade: Brigadier General François Etienne Damas (killed) 3rd Westphalian Light Infantry Battalion: lieutenant-Colonel von Hessberg
2nd Westphalian Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel von Fulgraf
6th Westphalian Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Rouel
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Karl Heinrich Emil Alexander von Borstell 2nd Westphalian Light Infantry Battalion: Lieutenant-Colonel Bödicker
3rd Westphalian Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Bernard
7th Westphalian Line Infantry Regiment: Colonel Smallian
Artillery: Captain Frede 1st Westphalian dismounted Artillery Company: Major Fröde
1st Westphalian Artillery Train Company
24th Infantry Division: Division General Adam Ludwig von Ochs 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Legras Guard Grenadier Battalion: Major Muldner
Guard Chasseur Battalion: Major Picot
Chasseurs-Carabiniers Battalion: Battalion Commander von Stein
1st Westphalian Light Infantry Battalion: Major von Raushenplatt
Artillery: Captain Lamaitre 2nd Westphalian foot Artillery Company: Captain Volmar
Horse Artillery Battery of the Westphalian Guard
3rd Westphalian Train Company
Cavalry: Brigadier General Hans Georg von Hammerstein-Equord 24th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Hans Georg von Hammerstein-Equord 1st Westphalian Hussars Regiment: Colonel Ferdinae Baron von Zandt
2nd Westphalian Hussars Regiment: Colonel von Hessberg
Guard Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Marc François Jérôme Wolff Westphalian Regiment of Guard Light Horse: Colonel Muller
Artillery Horse Artillery Battery of the Westphalian Guard
Artillery Park: Battalion Chief Schulz Westphalian Artillery Reserve Detachment
4th Westphalian Train Company
Westphalian Sapper Company
Westphalian Artillery craftsmen Detachment
Westphalian Crew Detachment
Westphalian Gendarmerie Detachment
Cavalry Reserve: Field Marshal Joachim Murat I Reserve Cavalry Corps: Division General Etienne-Marie-Antoine-Champion Nansouty 1st Light Cavalry Division: Division General Pierre-Joseph Bruyere 3rd Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Claude-Charles Jacquinot 7th Hussards Regiment: Colonel Eulner
9th Light Cavalry Regiment: Colonel Gobrecht
4th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Hippolyte-Marie-Guillaume Pire 16th Regiment de Chasseurs à cheval: Colonel L'Haillier
8th Hussards Regiment: Colonel du Coetlosquet
15th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Joseph Nienwieski 6th Polish Uhlans Regiment: Colonel Lagouski
8th Polish Uhlans Regiment: Colonel Prince Dominique Radziwill
2nd Regiment of united Prussian Hussars: Colonel von Ziethen
Artillery 7th Company of the 6th Horse Artillery Regiment
1st Cuirassiers Division: Division General Antoine-Louis Saint-Germain 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Adrien-Francois Bruno 2nd Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Pierre Rolland
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Bertrand Bessières 3rd Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel D'Audenarde
3rd Brigade: Brigadier General Mathieu Quenot 9th Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Michel-Francois Sestrieres de Murat
1st Squadron of 1st Chevau-légers Regiment: chef d'Escadron Dumanoir
Artillery 1st Company of the 5th Horse Artillery Regiment
3rd Company of the 5th Horse Artillery Regiment
5th Cuirassiers Division: Division General Jean-Baptiste-Cyrus-Marie-Adelaide Valence de Timbrune de Thiembronne 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Nicolas Reynaud 6th Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Martin
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Pierre-Francois-Marie-Auguste Dejean 11th Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Pierre-Alexis Duclaux
3rd Brigade: Brigadier General Armand-Charles-Louis de Lagrange le Lievre 12th Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Curnieu
1st Squadron of 5th Chevau-légers Regiment: chef d'Escadron Guerin
Artillery 4th Company of the 5th Horse Artillery Regiment
5th Company of the 5th Horse Artillery Regiment
II Reserve Cavalry Corps: Division General Louis-Pierre Montbrun 2nd Light Cavalry Division: Division General Claude-Pierre Pajol 7th Light Cavalry Brigade: Colonel Desirat 11th Chasseurs à cheval Regiment: Colonel Desirat (killed)
12th Chasseurs à cheval Regiment: chef d'Escadron de la Bourdonnaye
8th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General André Burthe 5th Hussards Regiment: Colonel Meuziau
9th Hussards Regiment: Colonel Maignet
16th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Jacques-Gervais Subervie 3rd Württemberg Mounted Jaeger: Colonel Waldburg
1st Prussian Uhlan Regiment: Colonel von Werder
10th Polish Hussars Regiment: Colonel Vuinski
Artillery 1st Company of the 4th Horse Artillery Regiment
2nd Cuirassiers Division: Division General Pierre Watier 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Louis-Chretien de Beaumont 5th Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Jean-François Christophe
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Jean-Louis Richter 8th Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Grandjean
3rd Brigade: Brigadier General Joseph-Philippe-Marie Dornes 10th Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Franck
1st Squadron of 2nd Chevau-légers Regiment: Colonel Pierre-Marie-Auguste Berruyer
Artillery 1st Company of the 2nd Horse Artillery Regiment
4th Company of the 2nd Horse Artillery Regiment
4th Cuirassiers Division: Division General Jean-Marie-Antoine Defrance 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Louis-Claude Chouard 1st Tirailleurs Regiment: Colonel Francois Laroche
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Pierre-Louis-Francois Paultre de Lamotte 2nd Tirailleurs Regiment: Colonel Amable-Guy Blancard
3rd Brigade: Brigadier General Joseph Bouvier des Eclaz 1st Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Clerc
4th Squadron of the 4th Chevau-légers Regiment: Colonel Deschamps
Artillery 3rd Company of the 1st Horse Artillery Regiment
4th Company of the 1st Horse Artillery Regiment
III Reserve Cavalry Corps: Division General Emmanuel Grouchy (wounded) 3rd Light Cavalry Division: Division General Louis-Pierre-Aimé Chastel 11th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Pierre-Edme Gauthrin 6th Hussards Regiment: Colonel Vallin
8th chasseur à cheval Regiment: Colonel Talleyrae de Perigord
10th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General François-Joseph Gérard 6th Chasseurs à cheval Regiment: Colonel Ledard (wounded)
25th Chasseurs à cheval Regiment: Colonel Nicolas-Francois Christophe
17th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Jean-Baptiste Dommanget (wounded) 1st Bavarian Light Cavalry Regiment: Colonel von Wittgenstein (wounded)
2nd Bavarian Light Horse Regiment: Colonel Lessing
Prince Albrecht's Saxon Light Horse Regiment
Artillery 6th Company of the 6th Horse Artillery Regiment
6th heavy Cavalry Division: Division General Armand Lebrun la Houssaye (wounded) 1st Brigade: Brigadier General Nicolas-Marin Thiry (wounded) 7th Dragoon Regiment: Louis-Charles-Barthelemy Colonel Sopransi
23rd Dragoon Regiment: Colonel Briant
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Denis-Etienne Seron 28th Dragoon Regiment: Colonel Aimé-Sulpice-Victor Pelletier de Montmarie
30th Dragoon Regiment: Colonel Pinteville
Artillery 4th Company of the 6th Horse Artillery Regiment
5th Company of the 6th Horse Artillery Regiment
IV Reserve Cavalry Corps: Division General Marie-Victor-Nicolas de Faÿ de Latour-Maubourg 4th Light Cavalry Division: Division General Alexander Rozniecki 29th Light Cavalry Brigade: Brigadier General Casimir Turno 3rd Polish Uhlans Regiment: Colonel Alexander Radziminski
15th Polish Uhlans Regiment: Colonel Louis Pac
16th Polish Uhlans Regiment: Colonel Martin Tarnowski
Artillery 3rd Polish Horse Artillery Regiment
4th Polish Horse Artillery Regiment
7th Cuirassiers Division: Division General Jean-Thomas-Guillaume Lorge 1st Brigade: GeneralMajor von Thielemann Cuirassiers Regiment von Zastrow: Colonel Trutzchler
Saxon Bodyguard: Colonel Leyser
14th Polish Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Malachowski
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Hellmuth von Lepel (mortally wounded) 1st Westphalian Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Gitzeen
2nd Westphalian Cuirassiers Regiment: Colonel Bartinel
Artillery 2nd Westphalian Battery of Horse Artillery
2nd Saxon Battery of Horse Artillery von Hiller

Calendar

All dates on this page are in the Gregorian calendar (then twelve days ahead of the Julian calendar in use in Russia at that time).

Photos Credits

 Photo of Lionel A. Bouchon Photos by Lionel A. Bouchon.
 Photo of Marie-Albe Grau Photos by Marie-Albe Grau.
 Photo of Floriane Grau Photos by Floriane Grau.
 Photo of Michèle Grau-Ghelardi Photos by Michèle Grau-Ghelardi.
 Photo of Didier Grau Photos by Didier Grau.
 Photo of various authors Photos made by people outside the Napoleon & Empire association.